By the co-author of The easy Guide to Your Walt Disney World Visit 2019, the best-reviewed Disney World guidebook series ever.

Available on Amazon here.





Review: Frozen Ever After at Epcot



By Dave Shute

FROZEN EVER AFTER

Review Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.netThe ride Frozen Ever After replaced Maelstrom at Epcot in June 2016.

Using essentially the same ride system as Maelstrom, it takes you into and out of a special Summer Snow Day Celebration in Arandelle, along the way revisiting all of the key characters from Frozen and from the short Frozen Fever.

(See this for Jim Korkis on the background to this ride and the Norway Pavilion, where it is located.)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (18)

You begin in a village that contains Wandering Oaken’s Trading Post…

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (17)

…from which, curiously enough, you can see Hogsmeade in the distance.

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (16)

Just kidding.  You then pass a sign that gives you the only hint of the story of the ride–that is a winter day in summer, and that you will be touring Arandelle during the celebration of it.

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (14)

You board boats…

and visit with the key Frozen and Frozen Fever folk. The animatronics and setting are very well done–my pictures don’t really do them justice.

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (12)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (11)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (9)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (7)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (4)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (2)

Frozen Ever After from yourfirstvisit.net (5)

You will also, as you might imagine, hear some familiar tunes!

A must-see for those who love the movie and its songs, there’s not much to this ride for anyone else. A family trying to negotiate a minimum Frozen dose for their trip would be better served at the Frozen Sing Along at Disney’s Hollywood Studios, where humor makes that show of broader appeal.

The use of the old ride system means that this ride has a relatively low hourly capacity of about a thousand people.

As a result, you should aim for FastPass+ or ride it at park close.  The low capacity, proportion of rides allocated to FastPass+, people coming from early breakfasts, etc., breakdown history, etc., means that counting on low waits by arriving early may be a bad bet.

For more on strategies for trying to see Frozen Ever After while avoiding long waits, see this from my co-author Josh.

The 2017 easy Guide

Kelly B Can Help You Book Your Trip

Follow yourfirstvisit.net on Facebook or Google+ or Twitter or Pinterest!!

RELATED STUFF

2 comments

1 Jane { 01.19.19 at 2:57 pm }

Hi Dave, just finalized our plans for Nov ’19 (Thanksgiving week)! Our last visit was Nov ’15 so a lot has changed. I’m thinking that Frozen Ever After will be our toughest FP to get (as long as the Star Wars isn’t open yet….but we’re not really interested in Star Wars). Is that true? Is Frozen still a hard one to get? Most others we’ll want are for much older rides, like Space Mountain, Test Track etc. Thanks!

2 Dave { 01.20.19 at 6:47 am }

Jane, lately Flight of Passage and Seven Dwarfs Mine Train have been the hardest FP+ to get. By your date (ignoring Star Wars), Mickey and Minnie’s Runaway Railway will join that list. Frozen Ever After has gotten easier, as it is not a ride that engenders much repeat visits.

Leave a Comment | Ask a Question | Note a Problem

My response to questions and comments will be on the same page as the original comment, likely within 24-36 hours . . . I reserve the right to edit and delete comments as I choose . . . All rights reserved. Copyright 2008-2019 . . . Unless otherwise noted, all photos are by me--even the ones in focus--except for half a dozen from my niecelets . . . This site is entirely unofficial and not authorized by any organizations written about in it . . . All references to Disney and other copyrighted characters, trademarks, marks, etc., are made solely for editorial purposes. The author makes no commercial claim to their use . . . Nobody's perfect, so follow any advice here at your own risk.